Every job…


If you have a job without aggravations, you don’t have a job. Malcolm Forbes

If one has to treasure ones job what is most important is realizing the subtle nuances of the job more than merely knowing the job inside out. Every job is repetitive in nature and so monotony is common to all jobs. However every job has some skill sets critical to the job and only someone with the right aptitude and attitude can execute a job successfully. Every job has an element of boredom, a bit of frustration and unexpected twists that jar the normal flow and work tempo. If you look at these attributes of a job it is obvious that every job will have some unique problems that will irritate, annoy and frustrate anyone undertaking that task.

What one has to understand is that if these problems did not exist all jobs would be boring, non challenging and never fulfilling. In fact without these challenges it would never be a job but just a hobby. In a job there has to be rewards commensurate with the job challenges. Take the example of the job of a life guard at a beach. One can endlessly sit on the beachfront with nothing spectacular happening more so if it is a non tourist season. In no time one would be so board that despite having to do nothing and merely collect he pay check one would chuck the job and pursue something that is more active and challenging.  The same life guard during the tourist season would be constantly on his toes and taking risks to protect irresponsible tourists. This time he could be so over worked that he wants to quit to pursue something more relaxed.

There are many jobs where close team work and coordination are the most important aspect of the job. Here differences in personal temperament and in ability to put up with task master bosses and indecisive bosses, invariably is the flash point. Here there could be constant bickering, blame game going on and even the occasional flares ups. It can be challenging to match our temperament with those who have a different style and work ethics and yet as team members one has to work in close coordination. When collectively the task is not fulfilled there is the inevitable blame game and fall guy; but when there is success there is a collective feeling of achievement and a general environment of bohemia. Team sports like football, cricket and basketball often throw up bizarre examples of both extremes of collective ecstasy and ruthless passing the buck when the chips are down.

Changes in the job invariably create a tensions and apprehensions. If the change in job profile is due to a promotion or greater reward the tension and apprehension is more on ones ability to meet up with the new responsibilities. On the other hand sudden changes can make a person very apprehensive about what the future holds in store, makes people speculate on the long term effects of the change and there is a secretive hope that the change will be for the better. What is uniform is that there is disturbance and turbulence that is brought about by changes at work. The good part though is that all these numerous job aggravations keep us on our toes, make us agile at the workplace and most of all makes us value our jobs.

Remember: “The best way to appreciate your job is to imagine yourself without one.”Oscar Wilde

Try these:

  1. Jot down what you think is your dream job. Give it a title and a brief job description. Now enumerate 3 things in that job that you are sure you will dislike immensely.
  2. Write down 3 things that you hate in your current job. How are you coping with it now. Are there better alternatives to tackling these pet hates?

This post is courtesy www.actspot.com

You are also invited to visit our WEEKLY Inspirational and Motivational Blog www.poweract.blogspot.com

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s