Tag: Judgment

The scars tell a story

The scars tell a story

As one goes through life, an individual encounters various experiences; some pleasant, a few unpleasant and some experiences are so traumatic that they remain lifelong, like a scar left behind by a deep wound. Yet the fact that you have faced your challenges with courage and continue to progress in life, is a huge victory, and the scar left behind emotionally or physically,  becomes a symbol, a reminder and a story of the battles you have participated in.

Unfortunately life is unforgiving and so new battles emerge and the challenge is to cope with it. If you get scars let it not scar your life but let it just be scar on the flesh and not the spirit. This is tougher than it seems because it is the mind that needs to be tamed, the spirit that needs to be ignited and the future that one should beckon with open arms, if the wounds from the battle have to be healed and the scars become a distinguishing mark of your spirit.

Your scars will tell a proud story when you:

Believe in yourself – Until you believe that you have the moral courage and personal commitment to fight for your rights, you will rarely engage. Once you believe in yourself, then your focus will be on ensuring you are not denied what is your legitimate due. That is the time you take on the mighty with all your might and in the process you will get hurt, some injuries can be painful, occasionally you will be dispirited but when the dust settles after the fight, even if you have not won, you would have at least scored a moral victory and the resultant scars would become a badge of honor and inspiration.

Fight for your right – The intensity of your fight will directly proportionate to the intensity of your belief in the cause. Once you decide that you have a legitimate cause, no cross would be too heavy for you to bear. Discrimination, injustice, not getting your dues are causes that often trigger an individual to take cudgels for one’s self respect, rights and dignity. In the process, there would be some blood spilt, damage done and suffering to be endured. However, your conscience would be at ease once you have chosen to stand up for your rights. The resultant scars would again become proud badge of honor for you.

Stand up against injustice – You may perhaps not be affected but when you see those around you being denied justice, your conscience will often trigger action. Cowards may rationalize that it is not my fight but then if you don’t fight for your fellow men when they need support, then where and when will you get people to stand up for you when you are wronged? Injustice to anyone in any form must never be tolerated in civil society. However, standing by a cause that you believe in could mean taking on a fight against those more powerful, more self centered and more brutal. There could be serious consequences but the scars you get thereafter will be one’s you cherish.

Try these:           

  • List out the three major injustices that you believe are rampant around you. How can you work on mitigating these injustices?
  • Of all the rights you enjoy which is the one right you value the most. Do you think some sections of society are denied this right? Would you be able to lend your support to those denied this right?
  • What are the three rights as a citizen that you feel you are being denied? Can you write a strong letter to the concerned civic chief to get the matters addressed?

This post is courtesy www.actspot.com

You are also invited to visit our Inspirational and Motivational Blog

www.poweract.blogspot.com

Decisions shape destiny…go on make up your mind

It is in your moments of decision that your destiny is shaped.  Tony Robbins

Of all the numerous faults that one can be accused of, being indecisive is one of the most serious faults for it makes a person fearful, confused, inept and paralyzed, thereby losing out on opportunities to progress, be productive and attain success. The sports arena illustrates this best when an indecisive player becomes a bane for the team and the game by poor coordination and shoddy performance. Ever noticed the mispasses on the field, wayward shooting at the goal and the back chatting between team members; many of these are symptomatic of the malaise of poor decision making. In real life, anyone who often echoes his/ her concern of being confused can be quickly identified as someone prone to avoid taking a decision. Sadly, very often many of these people become indecisive not because they lack inputs but because there are too many equally attractive options or equally scary consequences and deciding on any one is challenging.

Here are four pointers to help one become an effective decision maker.

Analyze extensively but don’t get paralyzed by it. Paralysis by analysis is the bane of those who believe in extensive study in order to minimize the chances of failure. Most people would profess to study threadbare the situation that needs a decision so as to be able to make the best decision, but subconsciously many of them are trying to find the best way to hedge their decision should it fail. As a result making it fail safe becomes the focus rather than maximizing success. When risk appears we tend to demonize it and consequently vacillate between alternatives until forced into a decision either by time constraints or other external pressures.

Accept the reality that not all decisions will be right. Human nature comprehends failure to indicate ineffectiveness, incompetence and ineptness, faults which in our myopic opinion grievously devalue us in the eyes of others. The reality is that failure is proof that someone dared, someone miscalculated and that there could be alternatives to the path taken. How many were actually ruined by the mistakes made? Barring some who were foolhardy or blinded by a false sense of invincibility, every other person who failed learnt from those failures and bounced back with better decisive strategies.

Be aware of the consequences of taking the decision and also of not taking the decision. By being indecisive and avoiding making a commitment, the chances are that we are risking not grasping opportunities, perhaps even missing out on minimizing / avoiding failure and certainly ensuring that the original issue remains unresolved. .  Ask anyone who has invested in shares and stocks and chances are you will get more stories of failures in stock picking but probe further and then they will accept that they rue being indecisive. Many others will blame their impulsiveness in taking decisions that led to poor stock selection.

Never forget that it is only when you can bite the bullet that you can lead the charge. Every leader has invariably reached the top by getting bruised and battered in the battle field of life. What has set them apart is not just their doggedness and ability but their ability to take crucial decisions at critical junctures. At times their decisions could have backfired and send them hurtling down the steep slope of success but with renewed vigor and enthusiasm they took the decision to battle their way up.

Remember : Some people, however long their experience or strong their intellect, are temperamentally incapable of reaching firm decisions. James Callaghan

Try this:

  1. Play a game of snakes and ladders but here is the twist to make you be aware of decision making. Every time you roll the dice you have a choice to accept the number that comes up or to pass the move except if the number that is thrown up moves your counter to a slot with a snake, in which case you go down to the tail of the snake. Check how and when you make the ‘decision’ to pass your turn .Are there times you felt you made a mistake because you made the decision ‘to pass your turn or not to pass your turn’?
  2. Take a look at the video by one of the more popular lecturers at Harvard, Prof. Michael Sandel who is taking a module on the Moral Side of Murder. Remember to pause the video after he asks the first set of questions and make it a point to make ‘your DECISION’ to the question he asks. Also ensure you are clear why you made that decision.  Then continue the video till he asks the second set of questions based on a scenario he describes. Again pause the video and make a decision based on the question.  Perhaps a different facet of ‘decision making’ will emerge and challenge you. Click here to view the video http://tinyurl.com/yey37oe

 This post is courtesy www.actspot.com

You are also invited to visit our Inspirational and Motivational Blog

www.poweract.blogspot.com

The way to change MYSELF

Many people have ideas on how others should change; few people have ideas on how they should change. Leo Tolstoy

There is plenty of free advice floating around, most of it liberally dished out by ordinary folks who believe they have a solution to everyone else’s problem. Sadly in most cases if the problem is closer home, perhaps at the doorsteps of those who dish out these pearls of wisdom, they would grapple to come to grips with it. This sound ironic considering how appropriate the advice sounded for someone else but alas its potency seemed to vanish when a inch of it is applied at home. The conclusion that one can draw is that any advice given must first be tried and tested by those giving it before it is freely distributed around.

Here are four situations in the average person’s life where advice is often sought and given but rarely digested in the same form if the giver of the advice has to digest it himself// herself

Parenting and the generation gap. Each successive generation grapples with the problem of handling the younger generation. Each generation also gets ample advice from the previous generation most of which is very sound and based on good experience. The problem is that there is still a huge gap between us and the next generation which we normally try to rationalize and explain failing which we emotionalize the issue and pressurize. What we fail to understand is that we need to change with the times and adapt to the ways of a changing younger generation.

Facing the humdrum of everyday life. The daily grind of work that is the destiny of every individual rich or poor, young or old, healthy or sick often gets monotonous and boring. For others we would suggest a variety of solutions to cope with this situation. We could suggest job rotation, brining about variety in the job, finding creative ways to do the repetitive job, looking out for intrinsic motivations and where possible change jobs. The very same advice somehow seems to lose its charm, its appeal and its magic properties when we attempt to charge up our own monotonous everyday life. A major reason for this is our coziness and comfort of aligning with the known devil rather than risking it with a new devil as a result of which the very advice we give others ends up being impotent and ineffective to rescue us from the hellish rigors of daily life.

Managing life changing challenges. Change comes in many forms. While the furious pace of technological and scientific changes eases life in many ways mastering their functionality can be quite a change to manage. Remember the first time one tried to master the mouse on the computer. Imagine the challenge for those in the older age bracket.  More difficult are the emotional changes that challenge us be it death of a loved one, breakdown of relationships, pain of separation, job loss and the challenges caused by ill health and related trauma. Our problem is our inability to adopt and embrace the advent of technology and make peace with the upheavals brought about by the emotional changes.

Bidding good bye to life. Each of us comes with our expiry date stamped and hardcoded in our destiny. Yet being prepared to accept that reality is an extremely painful and heart wrenching prospect. While we would in all earnestness and honesty give courage to a dying person by drawing their attention to the goodness of afterlife and the prospect of never ending peace and happiness, when we are merely asked to even think of an epitaph for our self the task seems frightening, ludicrous and insane. We do not fear death itself but the prospect of leaving behind all those we love for we believe that they are the real possessions that matter.

Remember: The greatest discovery of all time is that a person can change his future by merely changing his attitude.  Oprah Winfrey

Try this:

  1. Write down the 3 most annoying things about the younger generation. (If you are a youngster write down 3 most annoying things about the older generation.) Now jot down 2 reasons that you think are why these seem to annoy. Perhaps you now get a better perspective of the other side.
  2. Who are the 3 people who you would like to speak to in the last moments of your life? What would you like to tell them?
  3.  Here are two links to help you connect with 2 heroes who coped with drastic CHANGE in their lives.

 This post is courtesy www.actspot.com

You are also invited to visit our Inspirational and Motivational Blog

www.poweract.blogspot.com

The challenge of decision making

If we wait until we’ve satisfied all the uncertainties, it may be too late. Lee Iacocca

One of the toughest parts of decision making is trying to minimize the uncertainties associated with the decision so as to ensure that we improve the chances of having taken the right decision.  There are numerous reasons why getting answers to all uncertainties is extremely difficult. To begin with there is a tradeoff between the time available to get all the inputs required to answer all uncertainties and the time frame within which to take the decision. There are numerous uncertainties where a judgment is the only way one can use to determine the probability of nailing the uncertainity.eg  if we visit a couple of doctors for each ones expert opinion on a serious illness and all of them suggest a different line of treatment, we have no choice but to go with one of those recommendations.  As a result, most times apart from using the available data we end up having to use our judgment and rely on our prior experience to arrive at a decision.

One of the most common ailments of decision making prevalent largely in the corporate world is described as Paralysis by analysis. Here the problem arises not because the decision to be made is really tough but more because the decision makers don’t want to be held responsible in case their decision goes wrong.  As a result they would attempt to use all techniques and tools to study and analyze the data available and they would even tweak it till it confirms what they want to believe or prove so that there is ample paperwork to justify their decision. Unfortunately since most decisions are time bound, decision makers can be mentally paralyzed by the reams of analytical data that is generated which may be quite at variance with our expectations and the decision making process goes for a toss.

Decisions concerning relationships are even more tough because it calls for a value judgment. A simple test is to write down the qualities of an ideal spouse. Most times this process for married people poses a serious problem of having to forcefully appreciate the qualities of a spouse. For those yet unmarried the problem is one of how to prune the list. The tough part is yet to come;  for those who are yet to be married the question is how does one really recognize this quality or attribute in their to be spouse for the married person it is accepting the reality that many of those attributes longed for are utopian and unrealistic now. Breaking off a friendship or relationship is perhaps one of the toughest decisions because it is hurtful, painful, emotional and distressing for all concerned. Many a time this happens when there is mistrust and doubt and an amicable parting is often difficult but inevitable. Here the sheer pressure of the uncertainly in the relationship could prove to be a mill stone in the relationship which ultimately drowns it perhaps a wee bit too late.   Even more tough is to take a decision to part because pure rational itself does not provide the answers to all the uncertainties associated with the relationship. E.g. An office romance between a married boss and a subordinate or social pressures associated with a gay relationship or the breaking up of a partnership or a joint venture because the parties have divergent view points.

Remember: “My basic principle is that you don’t make decisions because they are easy; you don’t make them because they are cheap; you don’t make them because they’re popular; you make them because they’re right.”  Theodore Hesburgh

Try this:

  1. Your most intimate friend has picked up a new job and ever since his visits and interactions have come down.  You are disappointed and not sure if it is only the new job that is the reason for this sudden drop in communications and interactions. You are confused and hurt but you still cherish his friendship. How will you ensure that you don’t take a drastic or wrong decision by cutting off all your ties while at the same time ensuring that he still values your friendship?
  2. You are at a famous art museum that has a Picasso, a Rembrandt and a Van Gogh painting among some other prized paintings being exhibited. Suddenly there is a fire in the museum and you are able to save just one painting. Which painting will you save?  (The answer to this will be published in our weekly blog www.poweract.blogspot.com before this weekend)

This post is courtesy www.actspot.com

You are also invited to visit our WEEKLY Inspirational and Motivational Blog www.poweract.blogspot.com

The risks of not taking a risk

And the trouble is, if you don’t risk anything, you risk even more. Erica Jong

We are all familiar with fence sitters who believe that they are very safe by not committing to anyone and thereby taking minimum risks of annoying anyone or being held responsible for any decisions.  On the face of it the strategy looks good, but in reality when the mud settles, the fence sitter has a status almost akin to that of a traitor and for no one trusts him/ her. This is just one of the many downsides of being risk averse. Each day brings about a fresh set of challenges and there are risks of varying degrees every moment. Obviously it is human nature to avoid all risks possible and to venture only if there is reasonable chance of mitigating the risks. However in a fast paced world the changes taking place are stupendous and we cannot simply wait and watch; this means we have to commit and that is a risk by itself.

Making a commitment is the ultimate test of risk taking. This is because once the commitment is made there is no turning back and even if things are going downhill, we cannot make a U turn and reverse the pledges made. Commitments are made based on certain understanding, certain assumptions and a whole lot of trust. A misunderstanding can prove costly, as will a wrong assumption and a breach of trust will fully negate the original commitment but those committed cannot turn tail for there might not be any escape route or exit provided for. In today’s day and age, one of the biggest commitment is the marriage wows. The world wide statistics show that the divorce rate is fast catching up with the marriage rate; thereby showcasing the big blot on the institution of marriage. The risks in marrying as so real that today pre nuptial agreements have become a hedge against the risk of marriage.

If we observe those actively trading in the stock markets we would notice that they are driven by the urge to take risks. No doubt the lure of filthy profits is the key motivator for the stock traders but it is their craving to take the risks and beat the odds that really stimulates them. Someone on a losing spree, is often tempted to risk double his money in order to recoup the losses. This is an extremely risky strategy but by not taking that risk, the chances of recouping are almost negligible. A venture capitalists on the other hand has perfected the art of risk taking. They see opportunity in radical ideas, new technology, innovative strategies etc. and they study it in depth before taking the risk of funding some of these concepts. Venture capitalists are very clear that unless they take calculated risks they cannot function. However they are also clear that they need to spread their risks and so they fund a slew of identified ideas knowing fully well that a couple of them will fail, but they are confident that the vast majority will be hugely profitable and their risks are well managed.

In our own lives some of the most risky decisions pertain to our educational choices, career choices, marriage, family, retirement plans etc. It is imperative to note that whatever the reasoning or ultimate decision we are taking a risk. In most cases we have the freedom and choice to take the decisions but if we don’t, then the risks are almost certainly thrust on us by circumstances or fate. Why leave that risk to chance when we have the opportunity to take calculated risks?

Remember: “Take calculated risks. That is quite different from being rash.”  General George S. Patton

Try this:

  1. Make a list of things you are passionate about but never attempted. Choose one of the items and work out a plan of action to indulge in it and if possible take it up passionately. E.g. Learning to waltz or playing the trumpet or running a marathon
  2. To get a first hand feel of risks go once to a casino or a derby or an auction and participate in it to the best of your ability. Be aware that you risk money but perhaps you will also experience the adrenaline flowing when your stakes are high.

This post is courtesy www.actspot.com

You are also invited to visit our WEEKLY Inspirational and Motivational Blog www.poweract.blogspot.com

Trust begets trust

The only way to make a man trustworthy is to trust him. Henry L. Stimson

Human nature being what it is, we tend to have strong likes and dislikes largely based on our perceptions which in turn are deeply influenced by our biases and prejudices. One of the most  common bias pertains to assuming that someone who is shabbily dressed is poor and perhaps not to be completely trusted whereas  someone nattily dressed is rich an therefore trustworthy.  World over the quantum of white collared crimes is rapidly growing and yet using our quixotic logic, we tend to mistrust people who we are biased against. What we forget this old adage that ‘trust begets trust’.

As individuals we may have often resented our own parent’s inquisitiveness into our affairs which may have bordered on the cusp of insensitive distrust of our activities.  Our rational and oft repeated argument would be that we are mature and responsible and so we must be trusted to do the right thing at the right time. In fact if we are pressurized by the constant peering over our shoulder behavior, in frustration we would resort to some unruly behavior, bend some rules, express our annoyance more aggressively or simply revolted.  The human mind is conditioned to value its independence and responsibility which unfortunately is often overlooked by those in authority or power, be it parents, teachers, superiors or colleagues.

On the other hand, observe the behavior of people to whom we entrust responsibility and also express our confidence in. More often than not they exceed our expectations, simply because they do not want to let down our confidence in them. There would always be exceptions, but they are few and far and in between. Many of those who fail our trust have either foolish self centered interests or are simply incompetent. While the later can be excused and if possible given a second chance, those who deliberately fail us also need a second chance and perhaps closer supervision.  Trusting a person also offers the other person a chance to act independently and discover his/ her own abilities and potential. Even more important is the fact that by trusting a person you are giving the persona seal of our approval not just for his / her integrity but also for their skill, their competence and their resourcefulness.

How does one trust? It is never easy to overcome our personal bias and prejudices. So the first step is to be aware of our skewed thought process and possible irrational approach when we have to deal with people. Once we identify the people to who we need to entrust work, it is essential that w make sure that they have the ability and knowledge to be entrusted with the task. This is to be followed up with a conscious, well thought out plan of gaining the confidence of the others which often entails explaining our expectations of the other, reasons for our confidence in them and outlining the parameters which govern the relationship. Eg. If we employee a driver, it is prudent to check his credentials, then test his driving skills. Give them the brief and expectations and if possible make reference to any favorable recommendations received.  Avoid all temptations to do back seat driving but do pass on specific instructions that you would like him to follow. It is Bon Voyage then.

Remember: “The key is to get to know people and trust them to be who they are. Instead, we trust people to be who we want them to be- and when they’re not, we cry.”

Action Points:

  1. Read the well known parable of the tree talent from the Bible by clicking the following link. http://bible.org/seriespage/parable-talents-matthew-2514-30-luke-1912-28Notice that the master TRUSTS his servants and the first two servants in turn trust the master.; alas the third servant does not TRUST his master and so faces the consequences of his lack of trust.
  2. Ask yourself if you mistrust people because of your biases and if that is true identify those biases.  Do you attach too much importance to hearsay and as a result do not trust easily? Recollect at least 3 instances where you made an error in judgment about people you had to deal with.

This post is courtesy www.actspot.com

You are also invited to visit our WEEKLY Inspirational and Motivational Blog www.poweract.blogspot.com

At judgment time

If you judge people, you have no time to love them.  Mother Teresa

Our perceptions about people have an unusually disproportionate influence on how we deal with them, how closely we interact with them and how much of confidence we have in them. Be it our own countrymen or be it dealing with foreigners, we have our biases that keep triggering our senses at regular intervals and which acts as a filter to ensure that we are communicating to suit the circumstances and the personnel involved. The net result is that we convey a feeling of suspicion, make the counter party wary and lengthen the process of establishing relationships. Ironically most of our biases prove to be negative in nature and woefully wrong which makes us feel sheepish and embarrassed.

The problem with most of us is that we have our own skewed logic that is based upon hearsay, opinions and personal prejudice which results in us judging people all the time. When we judge people the natural tendency is to look at people as prone to being deviant, problematic and difficult to deal with. This negative mindset offers us the luxury of being excessively vigilant, deeply suspicious and probably resentful of the other without feeling guilty, since we see it as a protective mechanism to shield our life and liberty. By the time we realize our folly some connections have been disturbed, many opportunities lost and most interactions have become stilted. Relationships take a lot longer to flower than what would have if we didn’t let our judgment cloud our senses.

Look at the beggars, the marginalized, the poor and the sick and ask yourself what thoughts come to mind. While we begin to feel sorry for them, we quickly summarize that most of them can easily earn a good living by hard work but prefer to be lazy and eek out a living by being parasites feeding of the rich and the hardworking people like us. None of us would have ever cared to talk to them, understand their plight or even bothered to smile at them. In fact we go out of way to shun them lest they take our goodness for our weakness.  The problems of the mentally challenged and those in prison are even more acute because we fear them, conclude that they do not deserve to be set free in civilized society and wish that they be shown mercy by a quick and painless death.  While all of us proclaim to be epitomes of LOVE, we are selective in choosing whom to love and we are very clear about maintaining our distance from those we natural prefer to shun.

While it may be difficult for us to remain unbiased and completely rational, we need to accept the fact that we can with some willpower and by suspending judgment be more pragmatic about those unfortunate people around who crave for love and affection. The challenge for us is be honest about our true feelings and biases and become aware of that influencing our rationality. Do you pass judgment on your parents when you get upset or angry with them? True you may hate them for a brief period, you may wish them to change to your way of thinking but you never stop loving them. What the world needs is for each of us to judge less and love more and automatically the world will be an oasis that for all mankind.

Remember: “We judge others by their behavior. We judge ourselves by our intentions.”  Ian Percy

Try this:

  1. Can you recollect at least 3 instances in your life when you felt wrongly judged and possibly punished for no fault of yours? How did you feel about those times? Was it the unfairness or the humiliation or the fact the culprits went scot free that hurt more?
  2. When you watch some of the reality shows like a Musical reality show or a Dance show or a Talent show are there times when you feel the judgment was biased or wrong? Do you think you are competent to make that observation? Ask yourself if you are being biased because of some remote connect with the participant eg. She is pretty or he shares the same name as you or he /she hails from your neighborhood.

This post is courtesy www.actspot.com

You are also invited to visit our WEEKLY Inspirational and Motivational Blog www.poweract.blogspot.com

Judge ye carefully

Judge not, that ye be not judged. Mt. 7:1

If and when we are called upon to arbitrate in disputes, be it between children or two bickering acquaintances or in case of a minor accident where both parties claim that the other was at fault the pressure to be fair is tremendous. It is precisely in these kind of situations that the temptation to pass quick judgment pressurizes us into being poor listeners and even poorer arbitrators and the net result is that our own competence and values are under cloud. Suddenly we are being judged and the verdict possibly embarrassing. The reality is that we cannot escape our responsibilities but we surely can ensure that we do a competent job of it.

As we traverse through life, there are numerous occasions when consciously or unconsciously we pass judgment, most of it based on our perceptions. Yes, perceptions are one of those major influencers that prod us on to pass judgments based less on facts and more on feelings. Perceptions are instantaneous judgment passed about a person or situations which are influenced by past experience, our personal frame of reference and the scene as it appears to us at first sight. As an example just visualize the image that comes to mind when you hear the word European or Chinese. Did you visualize a dark skinned European or Chinese?  We are conditioned to visualize certain characteristics and traits based on hear say, learning and influenced by our personal biases.

Facts they say are sacrosanct. In a court of law all judgment is based on the facts made available and the evidence placed before the judiciary. It therefore stands to reason that when we have to judge we too should base our decisions on the facts available. We however have a tendency to prejudge an issue and succumb to the temptation of fitting the evidence to suit our point of view. Assume for a moment that a close friend is involved in a squabble with a neighbor and you happen to be at the scene. It is obvious that if you had to pass judgment, the reality of your friendship with one party will influence your judgment which more often than not will be in favor of your friend.  Personal bias has a disproportionate influence on our judgment.

When judging others we need to be humane and take a holistic view of the case. Just because a student was caught cheating in an exam once, we cannot brand him / her a cheater and rob them of their dignity. We need to also look at the mitigating circumstances for man is not born with bad intent but circumstances and fate may have conspired to put him/ her in the docks. A person committing a robbery in order to treat his ailing wife or kids must have been driven by desperation and would have to be treated differently from that of a habitual robber. We are particularly unkind in our judgment of differently abled people for example, who we pity rather than appreciate their steely resolve and spirit in competing with the rest of the able bodied population. Despite our education and ability to read and understand the vast majority of us have precious knowledge of those having varied problems relating to the mental faculties. We brand all people who suffer from the slightest mentally challenging problems be it slow learners, autistic children, those having motor neuron illness etc. as mad.

Finally judgment is all about a consistent value system being in place.  A high profile senior executive who falsifies his expense statement or fudges the accounts of his corporate are considered wiz kids simply because they manage to please most of the interested parties. If one looks around and tracks the numerous cases of high profile financial fraud, plagiarism by the respected academicians, falsified scientific claims by highly rated scientists and the crooked means adopted by thick skinned politicians to further their own interest we realize that their crime was a result of poor judgment shown by them when they subverted their value systems for short term gains. Their crime has now come to haunt them, embarrass them and punish them; their error of judgment notwithstanding.

Remember: “We judge others by their behavior. We judge ourselves by our intentions.” Ian Percy

Try this:

  1. Recollect a situation in your life where you were wrongly accused of a crime you didn’t do. E.g. You did not create disturbance in the classroom but the teacher punished you. What were you feelings? Did you want to get even with those who passed the wrong judgment on you? Did you ever once think of the numerous times you went scot free although you were guilty of misdemeanor that deserved punishment?
  2. Read the story about the cookie thief that illustrates how our judgment can go horribly wrong sometimes.  http://www.buddhapadipa.org/plinks/PSAG-77RUEG

This post is courtesy www.actspot.com

You are also invited to visit our WEEKLY Inspirational and Motivational Blog www.poweract.blogspot.com